America's Dilemma in the Far East

By T. A. Bisson | Go to book overview

DOCUMENTS

The State Department has made available extensive collections of documents on recent American Far Eastern policy in PEACE AND WAR (Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C.) and UNITED STATES FOREIGN RELATIONS: JAPAN, 1931-1941 (Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C.) These volumes should be consulted in order to supplement the selected list which is here given.

1. PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S STATEMENT REGARDING TRANSPORT OF MUNITIONS TO CHINA AND JAPAN ON AMERICAN SHIPS. SEPTEMBER 14, 1937.

"Merchant vessels owned by the Government of the United States will not hereafter, until further notice, be permitted to transport to China or Japan any of the arms, ammunition, or implements of war which were listed in the President's proclamation of May 1, 1937.

Any other merchant vessels, flying the American flag, which attempt to transport any of the listed articles to China or Japan will, until further notice, do so at their own risk.

The question of applying the Neutrality Act remains in status quo, the Government policy remaining on a 24 hours basis."

Source: The Department of State, Press Releases, September 18, 1937, p. 227.

2. U. S. NOTE OF PROTEST AGAINST THE BOMBING OF NANKING. SEPTEMBER 22, 1937.

"The American Government refers to the statement by the commander in chief of the Japanese Third Fleet which was handed to the American consul general at Shanghai on September 19 announcing the project of the Japanese Naval Air Force, after 12 o'clock noon of September 21, 1937, to resort to bombing and other measures of offense in and around the city of Nanking and warning the officials and nationals of third powers living there 'to take adequate measures for voluntary moving into areas of greater safety.'

"The American Government objects both to such jeopardizing of the lives of its nationals and of noncombatants generally and to the suggestion that its officials and nationals now residing in and around Nanking should withdraw from the areas in which they are lawfully carrying on their legitimate activities.

"Immediately upon being informed of the announcement under reference, the American Government gave instruction to the Amer-

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