Enchanted Wanderer: The Life of Carl Maria von Weber

By Lucy Poate Stebbins; Richard Poate Stebbins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
Father and Son

Wer reitet so spät durch Nacht und Wind?
Es ist der Vater mit seinem Kind
.*

-- GOETHE

HOHENLINDEN AND THE FRENCH OCCUPATION WERE STILL IN THE future when the Webers returned to Salzburg and to Michael Haydn. The famous organist was then a man of sixty, given to liquor, glum of face and gruff of tongue. His illustrious elder brother is said to have remarked in his genial way that Michael's church music surpassed his own. Michael, whose manners were not of the best, muttered that with Joseph's opportunities he would have shown himself the better man in every way. Yet he was an honest fellow, and Mozart had been fond of him, testifying his regard in the usual fashion by the dedication of a pair of duos for violin and viola.

But Carl Maria went in terror of the Salzburg Haydn. Looking back from manhood on the shrinking boy and the master's awful brow, perhaps forgetting the strength and beauty of the Mass he had written for him but never published, Weber wrote: "There was too wide a gulf between the stern man and the child. I learned little from him, and that little with great effort." Heuschkel had grounded him in pianoforte playing. Michael Haydn introduced him to counterpoint; and, though his lovely voice did not sufficiently commend him to the famous Boys' Choir Institute, his

____________________
*
"Who rides so fast through the midnight wild? It is the father with his child."

-19-

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Enchanted Wanderer: The Life of Carl Maria von Weber
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Chapter I- Noisy Webers 3
  • Chapter II- Father and Son 19
  • Chapter III- Lad''s Will 38
  • Chapter IV- Stranger at the Erl-King''s Palace 53
  • Chapter V 65
  • Chapter VI- Further Search for the Blue Flower 80
  • Chapter VII- Pilgrim and Stranger 93
  • Chapter VIII- Soul in Bondage 115
  • Chapter IX- Wanderer''s Night Song 137
  • Chapter X- The Lovely Town 151
  • Chapter XI- Bridal Chorus 170
  • Chapter XII 179
  • Chapter XIII- The Great Year 188
  • Chapter XIV- Top of the Mountain 206
  • Chapter XV- Sister Euryanthe 219
  • Chapter XVI- Sehnsucht 238
  • Chapter XVII- Journey without End 249
  • Chapter XVIII- Weber in London 260
  • Chapter XIX- The Lonely Heart 279
  • Appendix I- Fürstenau on Weber''s Treatment in London 289
  • Appendix II- The Descendants of Franz Anton Weber''s First Marriage 292
  • Notes 299
  • A Weber Bibliography 321
  • Index 339
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