The American Orchestra and Theodore Thomas

By Charles Edward Russell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
Like the Siege of a Fortress

WHETHER he would have plunged ahead on this road if he had known what it was to cost him is something to speculate about. At least, behold here the mercy that gives us hopes but denies us previsions. He had in this year done a thing that, being without precedent in musical history, any wise man then or since would have told him was impossible, and achievements of this kind are never stimulative of caution. Without a cent of his own, with no supporting society, group, or even individual, wholly alone in a city whose interest in orchestral music was next to nothing, he had organized a grand orchestra, and from its earnings, whatever they might be, had financed it through a regular season. This, we may recall ponderingly, in the America of 1864, where a brass band, a piano and the Jones Family Bell Ringers represented to the average person the attainable peak of musical joy. The thing seems now like some form of madness; even in this day no grand orchestra supports itself, or can. He must have had an airy confidence in himself, this youth. "The Theodore Thomas Orchestra", launched on these impossible terms upon its first season of symphonic soirées at Irving Hall, December 3, 1864, was his own wild bold notion, sprung exotically, it appears, out of his craving for artistic excellence. In his view of the matter, from an orchestra that he did not control he could never get the results he wanted; he could never have a composition so played as to satisfy his conscience while it took captive the interest of the public. Say that ten times a year a player performed under his direction; a hundred times a year the same player would

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Orchestra and Theodore Thomas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.