The American Orchestra and Theodore Thomas

By Charles Edward Russell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
Results

UPON the community where he had lived and served, the effect of his passing was something to be pondered then and remembered afterward. Great numbers of men and women that probably had never heard him play, whose interest in music one would suppose to be of the slightest, showed that they knew well his work and him and paid to both their simple tributes of respect. Perhaps they felt more by intuition than by gained wisdom that this man had followed lofty ideals and given himself unreservedly to a good aim. Therefore they honored him and mourned at his bier.

It is no figure of speech to say so. He died on Friday morning. Sunday afternoon there was held in the Auditorium, where he had been so long a familiar figure, a memorial service consisting of only music, the music that he had loved best to play. The great hall was filled to its utmost capacity. Butwhat was extraordinary and to the last degree affecting, the streets about the building were packed all that afternoon with crowds of silent people. There was no funeral cortége, there was no hearse, no coffin, there was nothing to be seen; but by a common instinct these people gathered there and stood in the cold winds of a January afternoon that they might in some way manifest their respect for the dead. I have never known a thing more impressive. It showed how much this man had come to mean to the people he had tried to benefit. With bowed heads they stood while the memorial was in progress that scarcely any of them could hear.

In St. James's Episcopal Church were held the funeral serv-

-304-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Orchestra and Theodore Thomas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.