CHAPTER II
HOTEL LIFE AND EARLY RECOLLECTIONS OF HANOVER

FOR two shy little boys, it was quite a change to pass from a quiet home to the life of a hotel where we were to live for four years. It was something of an ordeal at first to sit at the table with the elderly group of permanent guests, and when a family with children came we rejoiced in their youthful companionship.

The hotel was in two parts, one of brick and one of wood, and was connected in the middle by a long hall forming a large H. If anyone dared to race around, it gave an ample field for exercise. Mr. and Mrs. Horace Frary who presided very strictly over the hotel were lenient with us. They were both odd characters. Mrs. Frary was an excellent cook, but woe to the guest who complained of the food. 'What ails the biscuits this morning? I made them myself,' she would say in a voice which was far-reaching. Or, 'Wants his coffee hot, does he? Well, then, he better come to breakfast on time.' She shuffled as she walked with flapping heels and showed lively satisfaction when she had successfully squelched a boarder. She was really a woman of dignity, and with some grace greeted the Governor or any important guests of the college. Mrs. Frary liked cats. 'How many cats have you?' someone asked. 'Oh,' she replied, 'half a barrel.' They were never any nuisance so far as I know.

It was the funniest thing in the world to see Mr. Frary stand at the serving table and carve the side of beef. He would wipe his knife on his white trousers, and then, cutting off a slice of meat, would pick it up delicately with two fingers and lay it on the plate. He scorned a fork. But he loved Shakespeare and could quote long passages. Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, when he was a member of the Medical Faculty, knew Mr. Frary well and greatly enjoyed him. 'Hod,' as he was always called, was devoted to my father, but his sense of humor prevailed once in an illness when he remonstrated with his wife: 'Damn it, this is no time to be sending for a doctor. I'M SICK!'

-9-

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