CHAPTER VIII
AFTER COLLEGE -- WHAT

COLLEGE over, the next question was the future, and we had to make our arrangements while enjoying the pleasures of summer vacation. It was at this time that Sam Bartlett and I took a trip out into the world, going down to a summer hotel on the Sound at Niantic, Connecticut, for a few days. I had had very little experience with the sea and found the sailing a bit rough, but we had a good time, and then went over to Newport to give that resort our youthful inspection for a day. It was evidently not for us, but we had a pleasant time.

My brother found a position as sub-master in the Holderness School near Plymouth, New Hampshire. This was a church school under the direct supervision of the Episcopal Bishop of New Hampshire. It was a strange sight to see my brother robed in churchly habiliments marching with the processional and singing his best. Mother and I drove over to Plymouth on an autumn day and spent the week-end looking over his situation and meeting his friends at the school.

As for me, the family felt that I could afford the time to take some more courses in chemistry which I had not yet done in view of my extra work in physics, so I was enrolled as a post-graduate and started on the study of chemistry under Professor Bartlett. He soon found that he needed a little more assistance in his elementary course for medical students and asked me if I would be willing to give a couple of hours in the afternoon as assistant. I hope that the medics did not realize how I hustled every morning to complete each experiment which I was expected to teach them in the afternoon. I was hardly one jump ahead of them and certainly quite inadequate for the job, but my knowledge, little as it was, was certainly fresh and we got on all right. Later Dr. Bartlett asked me to assist similarly with some of the senior work in the Chandler Scientific School. I am sure that many of the men knew more about the subject than I did, but nevertheless in those days we did what we had to do whether we could or not.

-57-

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