CHAPTER X
BACK TO HANOVER

WHEN I took the steamer at Antwerp on my passage homeward, I found letters awaiting me regarding future positions in America. One was from the University of Minnesota, which was seeking a young man to carry on the work of astronomy, and the other was a proposition to return to Dartmouth as an assistant professor with duties in astronomy, but without responsibilities for teaching physics. I decided to return to Hanover, as I felt that this would be a satisfaction to my parents after my long absence.

After I was re-established in my home in Hanover in the autumn of 1892, I felt rather keenly the loss of the opportunity for research which had been the whole activity of the observatory at Potsdam, but looked forward with great satisfaction to teaching the classes at Dartmouth. After I had arranged for the courses which I was to give in astronomy, analytic mechanics, and meteorology, I devoted myself assiduously in my spare time to the translation and revision of Dr. Scheiner's work. It was quite a task, as the original was an octavo, with 482 pages, including extensive tables. I decided to use the Rowland system of wave-lengths instead of that employed at Potsdam. Rowland's photographic map represented such an advance in recording the solar spectrum that previous drawings could not for a moment be compared with it. It turned out some years later that the Potsdam system was nearer the absolute value than Rowland's, but the main issue for a couple of decades was to have an accurate system of relative wave-lengths. I therefore copied and published as the first tabular appendix Rowland's table of wave-lengths in the solar spectrum, which had appeared from measurements, both visual and on photographs, in the magazine Astronomy and Astrophysics in the year 1893. I gave the name Astronomical Spectroscopy to the edition in English, and the first issue bore the imprint 1894, It covered 495 pages. A final printing of a few hundred copies with some additions and alterations appeared in 1898. About ten per cent in conciseness of expression was saved in the translation into English from the

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