CHAPTER XIV
LAKE GENEVA AND YERKES OBSERVATORY

IN THE first week of July, we started with our infant daughter for the new adventure. At this time, we took neither furniture nor equipment for our new home. We knew that we could find accommodation for the summer at the well-known Camp Collie which consisted of a group of some cottages and dormitory buildings and a dining-hall. This camp was picturesquely situated on the shore of the lake and about a mile from the observatory.

We spent a night in Chicago with our friends Mr. and Mrs. James H. Breasted. On arriving at the station of Williams Bay, we were met by Mr. Hale and were taken on the handsome yacht of Mr. E. E. Ayer to the pier at Camp Collie. There were many pleasant people and some queer ones at the camp. I remember one woman who walked on her toes and with her arms outspread like the wings of a bird. She alleged that in her previous incarnation she had been either a bird or a squirrel, and she still lived largely on nuts. The camp had been used earlier by its owner, Dr. Joseph Collie, for forty years minister of the Congregational Church at Delavan, as a gathering-place for religious conferences. In fact, Dr. M. C. Hazard, Mrs. Frost's father, had been accustomed to come to the camp for such purposes in the seventies. Mr. and Mrs. Tracy Drake of Chicago had rented for the summer the country home of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Chalmers, which was situated close to Camp Collie. We were fortunate in having these delightful neighbors whose lasting friendship has been a great joy to us. Tracy and I are brothers of the D. K. E. Fraternity and for some years the Northwest Association has made an annual pilgrimage to Lake Geneva for golf, trips on the lake, and a visit to the observatory.

On the morning after my arrival at Camp Collie, I was addressed in a friendly manner by a man who was engaged in raking the walks and who appeared to be a gardener. He evinced a considerable interest in knowing from whence I came. With my normal New England chill, I replied, 'I came from the East.' He pressed me

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