CHAPTER XXIV
YEARS OF 1931-1932

I SPEAK in great humility of spirit about the events associated with my sixty-fifth birthday. My wife and daughter had entered into a conspiracy to have a little celebration for me knowing how much I would appreciate a word of greeting on this occasion from my friends both here and abroad. Little did any of us realize what would actually happen or that any publicity would be given to the event. When the Chicago Tribune telephoned that they were sending a man to cover the affair, I assured them that it was entirely uncalled for. The following day, however, Mr. Philip Kinsley arrived. He dealt with me most kindly, and I greatly treasure the article which was written by such an expert. I felt that there would be nothing left for my obituary notices.

Mr. Kinsley quoted two poems, one of them written by my son Frederick who had been at one time rather a regular contributor to the 'Line O'Type' column in the Tribune, under the pseudonym 'The Phantom Lover.' Frederick's poem was dedicated to me and was written not long before his marriage, and while he was still a student in the Department of Geology in the University of Chicago. The second poem was in turn written by me and dedicated to him soon after his marriage to Miss Helen L. Chapman on June 28, 1924.


THE BLIND ASTRONOMER

I see him day by day,
His clean, fine face -
His almost silver hair-
Smiling as he feels his way
Through awakening springtime days
He cannot hope to see.

His eager brain,
His search for Truth,
His finest hopes
Are caged and blinded
By the darkness of his eyes.

-250-

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