An Introduction to Philosophy

By James H. Ryan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
THE PROBLEM OF LIFE

The problems which we have dealt with up to this point had to do with the universe in its widest aspects. Thus, we have traversed the different theories which attempt to explain the nature of reality. Our examination seems to prove that after a most careful scientific and philosophical analysis, the belief of the plain man as to the dualistic nature of reality is justified. Everyday experience, no less than philosophy, confirm us in our acceptance of a dual principle in nature. Dualism, it is true, involves difficulties, but the difficulties are not so serious that they necessitate a revision of the fundamental doctrines, upon which this philosophy is based. The theory of Interaction also seems to be, considering the present state of our knowledge, a sufficiently reasonable explanation of the relations of body to mind. No argument yet advanced by Parallelist or Materialist is strong enough to force us to discard a doctrine which explains so well our experiences, and is in such complete harmony with them.

But these problems, with the solutions we have offered, do not by any means exhaust the questions which arise from our contemplation of the universe as a whole. Admitting that body and mind exist, and even interact, the philosopher seeks a more exact explanation than that already proffered as to the nature of this interesting relation. No exhaustive study is required to reveal to us the existence of different kinds of substances, whose characteristics are so marked

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An Introduction to Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Chapter I - Philosophy, Its Meaning, Scope, And Methods 1
  • References 23
  • Chapter II - The Problem of the One and the Many 25
  • References 53
  • Chapter III - The Problem of the Nature of Reality 54
  • References 72
  • Chapter IV - The Psycho-Physical Problem 74
  • References 108
  • Chapter V - The Problem of Life 109
  • References 143
  • Chapter VI - The Problem of Knowledge 144
  • References 201
  • Chapter VII - The Problem of the Nature and Criteria Of Truth 203
  • References 242
  • Chapter VIII - The Problem of Freedom 243
  • References 272
  • Chapter IX - The Problem of Morality 273
  • References 303
  • Chapter X - The Problem of the Self 304
  • References 340
  • Chapter XI - Philosophy, Science, and Religion 341
  • References 392
  • Index 395
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