An Introduction to Philosophy

By James H. Ryan | Go to book overview
facts. Upon facts as known and accepted by the majority of men, and as analyzed and described by science, it reflects in order to discover the reasons why things are as they are. It, therefore, does not precede either common sense or the achieved results of natural science. But philosophy is practical as well, for it guides men to the acceptance and the living of ideals which the moral reason has justified beforehand, and which conscience informs us we must accept if we would live as rational beings. Thus conceived, philosophy leads mankind step by step not only to the attainment of the highest truth and to the living of the noblest ideals of conduct, but to the gates of faith itself, by which we may enter into the vision of Him Who is Infinite Truth and into the possession of Him Who is Infinite Love.REFERENCES
BALFOUR: Theism and Humanism.
BOEDDER: Natural Theology.
BOSANQUET: The Value and Destiny of the Individual.
COLLINGWOOD: Religion and Philosophy.
DEWEY: Education and Democracy.
DE WULF: Article "Philosophy", Catholic Encyclopedia.
GARRIGOU-LAGRANGE: Dieu, Son Existence et Sa Nature; Le Sense Commun.
HALDANE: Essays in Philosophical Criticism.
HOERNLÉ: Studies in Contemporary Metaphysics.
JEVONS: Philosophy, What Is It?
JOYCE: Principles of Natural Theology.
LADD: Philosophy of Religion; Introduction to Philosophy.
LAIRD: A Study in Realism.
MARITAIN: Introduction Géngrale à La Philosophie.
MARVIN: Recent Developments in European Thought.
OLLÉ-LAPRUNE: La Philosophie et Le Temps Present.
PERRY: Present Philosophical Tendencies.
POINCARÉ: The Foundations of Science.
PRATT: The Religious Consciousness.
PRINGLE-PATTISON: The Idea of God.

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An Introduction to Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Chapter I - Philosophy, Its Meaning, Scope, And Methods 1
  • References 23
  • Chapter II - The Problem of the One and the Many 25
  • References 53
  • Chapter III - The Problem of the Nature of Reality 54
  • References 72
  • Chapter IV - The Psycho-Physical Problem 74
  • References 108
  • Chapter V - The Problem of Life 109
  • References 143
  • Chapter VI - The Problem of Knowledge 144
  • References 201
  • Chapter VII - The Problem of the Nature and Criteria Of Truth 203
  • References 242
  • Chapter VIII - The Problem of Freedom 243
  • References 272
  • Chapter IX - The Problem of Morality 273
  • References 303
  • Chapter X - The Problem of the Self 304
  • References 340
  • Chapter XI - Philosophy, Science, and Religion 341
  • References 392
  • Index 395
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