Madeleine Albright and the New American Diplomacy

By Thomas W. Lippman | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
WE STAND READY
FOR A DIALOGUE

IN JULY 1998, halfway through Albright's difficult second year in office, a group of Iranian athletes arrived in New York to take part in the Goodwill Games, a made-for-TV event sponsored by Ted Turner that was similar to the Olympics. Their arrival attracted little notice because by that time the American public was becoming used to the idea of cultural and athletic exchanges with Iran. But only a week earlier, the Iranians had announced cancellation of their participation in the Goodwill Games. They were unwilling to undergo the same undignified treatment that had confronted Iranian wrestlers in Chicago a few months earlier--fingerprinting and other security checks by U.S. immigration officials, required because Iran is on the State Department's list of nations that sponsor international terrorism. A seventy-five-year-old scholar of Persian poetry, arriving in the United States shortly before the games, got the same treatment.

Albright didn't want the Iranian athletes to cancel. She was trying to manage one of the most creative and challenging diplomatic initiatives of her tenure, a rapprochement with Iran. The United States has not had diplomatic relations with Iran since 1979; except at the United Nations, officials of the two countries had virtually no direct contact. Under such circumstances, conventional diplomatic techniques such as meetings with ambassadors and exchanges of visits were not available. To reach out to the Iranians, Albright was required to send indirect signals through unconventional channels

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Madeleine Albright and the New American Diplomacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 I Look Pretty Good in a Stetson 1
  • Chapter 2 They Can Call Me Madeleine 37
  • Chapter 3 A Marine Corps Kind of Girl 89
  • Chapter 4 I Was Queen of the May 130
  • Chapter 5 We Stand Ready for a Dialogue 172
  • Chapter 6 I Somehow Lost My Instincts 186
  • Chapter 7 We Did Not Blow It 211
  • Chapter 8 We Will Prevail 243
  • Chapter 9 This is What People Care About 272
  • Chapter 10 Freedom is America's Purpose 309
  • Notes 339
  • Bibliography 351
  • Index 353
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.