Madeleine Albright and the New American Diplomacy

By Thomas W. Lippman | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
WE WILL PREVAIL

IT WAS HARD to miss the symbolism of the plane Albright used for that long flight to Moscow: an air force E-4B, known as the "Doomsday Plane." The air force actually has four of these converted Boeing 747s, each equipped to be a flying presidential command center in case of a catastrophe, such as nuclear war, that would render the White House untenable. According to the air force, "In case of national emergency or destruction of ground command control centers, the aircraft provides a modern, highly survivable, command, control and communications center to direct U.S. forces, execute emergency war orders and coordinate actions by civil authorities." In other words, this is the plane from which the president could administer whatever was left of the United States after a Soviet nuclear strike. Hence the appellation, Doomsday Plane. It makes for depressing travel, because its bright fluorescent lights are on at all times, and it has no windows. It is outfitted for work, not for comfort.

The enemy the air force had in mind when the Doomsday Plane was built had ceased to exist. Albright was flying to Moscow at a time when a nuclear strike by an ICBM from the central Asian steppe was no longer a real threat. But in many ways relations with Moscow were more complicated than they had been in the era when doomsday seemed imminent.

Yeltsin was so enfeebled by illness--and perhaps by alcohol--that he seemed no longer able to run his country. At the time of Albright's visit, he was hospitalized with a bleeding ulcer. She spoke to him by phone but did not see him. The grim joke among

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Madeleine Albright and the New American Diplomacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 I Look Pretty Good in a Stetson 1
  • Chapter 2 They Can Call Me Madeleine 37
  • Chapter 3 A Marine Corps Kind of Girl 89
  • Chapter 4 I Was Queen of the May 130
  • Chapter 5 We Stand Ready for a Dialogue 172
  • Chapter 6 I Somehow Lost My Instincts 186
  • Chapter 7 We Did Not Blow It 211
  • Chapter 8 We Will Prevail 243
  • Chapter 9 This is What People Care About 272
  • Chapter 10 Freedom is America's Purpose 309
  • Notes 339
  • Bibliography 351
  • Index 353
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.