Edward Everett, Orator and Statesman

By Paul Revere Frothingham | Go to book overview

III
WANDER YEARS

THE packet ship in which Everett sailed away was a large one for the time, being of three hundred and fifty tons burden. It was the second vessel to leave port after the conclusion of peace. With him, as fellow- passengers, and forming a most congenial company, were George Ticknor, a young lawyer and graduate of Dartmouth College who was to go with Everett to Göttingen and study literature; Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Perkins and their son whom Everett was to take charge of; Mr. Haven, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire; and two sons of John Quincy Adams, who were going out to join their father, who was the United States Minister at St. Petersburg.

The voyage was a quiet one occupying a little over a month. They were not to make port, however, without some exciting experiences. All went well till they neared the English coast, and were running through St. George's Channel. The weather was thick, the wind was blowing a gale, and no observations had been secured for the past two days. The captain was uncertain as to his exact position, but thought himself on the Irish side of the Channel. Suddenly what was taken to be a ship loomed up through the mist, not two miles, distant. A moment later, however, the man on the lookout at the masthead cried out with a frightful voice -- 'A lighthouse -- breakers!' The captain thought it was Waterford Light, and the helm was jammed to port. But the next instant he discovered his error and whipping out a mighty oath the ship was put about in the nick of time. They had been sailing straight for the boiling breakers on the Welsh coast. Forty years afterwards Everett could say that he had never forgotten the captain's oath, nor the roar of the awful breakers which they just escaped.

-36-

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Edward Everett, Orator and Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • I - Background and Beginning 1
  • II - Pegasus in the Pulpit 19
  • III - Wander Years 36
  • IV - The Greek Professor 61
  • V - Apollo in Politics 93
  • VI - Governor of Massachusetts 127
  • VII - Port After Stormy Seas 157
  • VIII- At the Court of Saint James' 188
  • IX - A Diplomat in London 220
  • X - President of Harvard 265
  • XI - An Interlude 302
  • XII - Secretary of State and Senator 329
  • XIII - The Orator 373
  • XIV - With the God of Battles 414
  • Index 473
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