Edward Everett, Orator and Statesman

By Paul Revere Frothingham | Go to book overview

VII
PORT AFTER STORMY SEAS

IT was no simple undertaking in those days to go abroad, particularly when a stay of many months, if not a year or more, was contemplated. Florence was the objective of the party, and linen and plate had to be sent in advance for keeping house in Italy, as these articles were not included by Italians when they rented their houses or apartments. In addition to such articles as these, a rocking-chair was taken along for the faithful nurse, or attendant, Ruah. It was thought that this special type of chair, which was a thing unknown in Europe, would help to preserve the equilibrium of the maid and keep her from being homesick. The chair, however, proved a little too much for the French diligence, and it got no farther than Paris. The party, too, was a large one. They were eight in all including five children. The youngest member of the group was William, who was to distinguish, himself in later years as preacher, professor, poet, politician, and conspicuous public character generally, but then a child of eight months. Moreover, they narrowly escaped having their party added to most unpleasantly. When it became publicly known that Mr. Everett and his family were going abroad, the notorious Mrs. Holley, of Washington, wrote and suggested that she would like, with her son, to become, their travelling companion. This was more than even the courteous Everett could stand, and the letter which he wrote to Mrs. Holley in reply gave ample proof -- if any proof were needed -- that he was well fitted for the important diplomatic post that he was soon to be called upon to fill.

The family were supplied with three good staterooms on the thousand-ton packet, 'each with two berths and as much accommodation as could be expected on shipboard.' For these quarters the price paid was six hundred and seventy dollars, which included everything except wine on a voyage

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Edward Everett, Orator and Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • I - Background and Beginning 1
  • II - Pegasus in the Pulpit 19
  • III - Wander Years 36
  • IV - The Greek Professor 61
  • V - Apollo in Politics 93
  • VI - Governor of Massachusetts 127
  • VII - Port After Stormy Seas 157
  • VIII- At the Court of Saint James' 188
  • IX - A Diplomat in London 220
  • X - President of Harvard 265
  • XI - An Interlude 302
  • XII - Secretary of State and Senator 329
  • XIII - The Orator 373
  • XIV - With the God of Battles 414
  • Index 473
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