A History of British Honduras

By William Arlington Donohoe | Go to book overview

VI
Description of British Honduras

British Honduras is situated on the Atlantic side of the mainland of Central America and lies between 15′ and 19′ north latitude and 87′ and 90′ west longitude. It is bounded on the north by the Mexican Territory of Quintana Roo and on the west and south by the Republic of Guatemala. On the east lies the Carribean Sea and the Bay of Honduras.

The Colony is larger than Wales and is divided up into six districts: Belize, Corozal Orange Walk, Cayo, Stann Creek and Toledo districts. The most important towns are, Belize, Cayo, Corozal, Orange Walk, Benque Viejo, Punta Gorda and Stann Creek.

British Honduras has over 61,000 inhabitants. The great percentage of the colony's population are English speaking negroes and people of mixed negro and white blood. The remaining few are In

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A History of British Honduras
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 11
  • Preface 13
  • Introduction 15
  • 1- Early Inhabitants The Maya 19
  • II - History 1603 - 1799 27
  • III - Nineteenth Century 37
  • IV - 20th Century 49
  • V - Religion, Education, Customs and Music 57
  • VI - Description of British Honduras 73
  • Part II - The British-Guatemala Controversy 77
  • Introduction 79
  • I - Colonial Period 81
  • Part II -- 1803 - 1849 - Summary 87
  • Part III - Clayton-Bulwer Treaty of 1850. Boundary Convention Of April 30, 1859. Dallas-Clarendon Treaty 1856. Convention of 1863. 91
  • Part IV - Twentieth Century 99
  • Bibliography 105
  • Treaty Bibliography 111
  • Periodical Bibliography 113
  • The Maya 115
  • Index 117
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