The Press Gang: Newspapers and Politics, 1865-1878

By Mark Wahlgren Summers | Go to book overview

Notes

ABBREVIATIONS
CHS Cincinnati Historical Society
HML Rutherford B. Hayes Memorial Library, Fremont, Ohio
HSP Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
ISDAH Iowa State Department of Archives and History, Des Moines
ISHS Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield
ISL Indiana State Library, Indianapolis
LC Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
LL/IU Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington
LSU Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
MHS Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston
NHHS New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord
NYPL New York Public Library
OHS Ohio Historical Society, Columbus
SC Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts
SHC Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
SML/ YU Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University, New Haven
UP University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
UV University of Virginia, Charlottesville

INTRODUCTION
1.
Harper's Weekly, November 7, 1874; see also November 21, 1874. The epigraph is quoted, and titled "Washington Correspondents," in Washington Sunday Capital, April 23, 1871.
2.
Albert Bigelow Paine, Thomas Nast: His Period and His Pictures ( New York: Pearson, 1904), 278-81, 295-97.
3.
For just such mathematics, see New York Times, October 17, 1874.
4.
Harper's Weekly, November 3, 1866, February 3, 1877. See also July 27, October 26, November 23, 1872, February 28, 1874, April 15, 1876, and, in the backgrounds of "Amphitheatrum Johnsonianum," March 30, 1867. While seeking to avoid the use of gender-specific language in this book, I have retained the term newspapermen when it applies historically. The plain truth is that women report-

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