Sunfield Painter: The Reminiscences of John Davenall Turner

By John Davenall Turner | Go to book overview

4 The Second Farm

While physical hardships were the common lot of early homesteaders, unfortunately they were not the only obstacle to progress, being augmented in our case by financial difficulties. The slender resources upon which the venture had been undertaken were soon exhausted while any prospect of revenue from it appeared to diminish. It gave rise to deep concern and to the remark, made at intervals by either Mother or Father, "We must write to Gasquet."

This was the name of a London solicitor who was the custodian of some mysterious funds held in trust for us children. He was occasionally urged to pay out fractional amounts in advance of our reaching the required aged of twenty-one when told that, otherwise, it was unlikely that any of us would survive to that age to become beneficiaries.

When it ultimately became obvious that our original homestead site would never provide the means of survival due to lack of water, timber, tillable soil, and other defects, with Gasquet's help we were enabled to abandon the premises and secure another quarter-section with these

-31-

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Sunfield Painter: The Reminiscences of John Davenall Turner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Note: vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - The Ten-Dollar Homestead 1
  • 2 - Settling In 10
  • 3 - A New Way of Life 21
  • 4 - The Second Farm 31
  • 5 - Looking for a Job 39
  • 6 - The Edmonton Plastic Display Company 45
  • 7 - Sketches for Five Dollars 59
  • 8 - Expedition to the East 68
  • 9 - Home Again 85
  • 10 - The War Years 95
  • 11 - The Art Gallery 109
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