Sunfield Painter: The Reminiscences of John Davenall Turner

By John Davenall Turner | Go to book overview

6 The Edmonton Plastic Display Company

In the intervening time the family had become rather more scattered. Father was living in an apartment and, of my sisters, Florence had married and Elsie was working in Mexico City.

Having made our contributions with varying success to the war effort, my two brothers and I took up residence together in Edmonton in a strange little house situated on the back of a lot on 107 Street. An annex to a rooming-house, our abode had been converted for dwelling purposes from what had formerly been a large garage. In the limited space we set up the old furniture that had been hauled across the prairie in 1906. The acquisition of several dogs and cats added to the congestion.

Alan and Frank had always possessed a strong predilection for art and I strove to emulate them. By now we all shared a full sense of dedication to the subject. In addition to their skill in the field of graphic art, my two brothers developed an enthusiasm for sculpture. While they were busy making gelatine molds and spreading a deep layer of plaster of

-45-

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Sunfield Painter: The Reminiscences of John Davenall Turner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Note: vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - The Ten-Dollar Homestead 1
  • 2 - Settling In 10
  • 3 - A New Way of Life 21
  • 4 - The Second Farm 31
  • 5 - Looking for a Job 39
  • 6 - The Edmonton Plastic Display Company 45
  • 7 - Sketches for Five Dollars 59
  • 8 - Expedition to the East 68
  • 9 - Home Again 85
  • 10 - The War Years 95
  • 11 - The Art Gallery 109
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