Economic Problems of War and Its Aftermath

By Chester W. Wright | Go to book overview

PREFACE

EACH chapter in this volume is based on a lecture in a series delivered under the Charles R. Walgreen Foundation at the University of Chicago early in 1942. The series was designed to promote the objectives of the Foundation indicated in the Foreword.

The series, which was planned early in the autumn of 1941 before the United States entered the war, was addressed to the general public rather than to specialists and was designed to promote the formulation of a more intelligent public opinion on the problems dealt with, the need for this being only too clearly shown by the country's efforts to meet the economic problems of its earlier wars. The lectures, being limited in number, make no pretense at covering the whole subject. Each contributor dealt with some one phase of the general problem that fell within his particular field of competence and there was no attempt made to secure uniformity of presentation either in method or in style.

The first two chapters are historical in character--the first presents an analysis of the effect of warfare on industrial development in Western Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the second attempts to summarize the most important lessons of a general character to be learned from the previous efforts of the United States to meet the economic problems arising in war. The two following lectures deal with the specific problems of war finance and price control, explaining the character of each and describing what has thus far been done by the United States in the effort to meet them. The last three lectures deal with the broader but very fundamental problems

-ix-

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Economic Problems of War and Its Aftermath
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Table of Contents xi
  • War and the Early Industrial Revolution 1
  • Economic Lessons from Previous Wars Chester W. Wright 54
  • Next Steps in Financing the War Simeon E. Leland 78
  • Price Controls 112
  • The War State 126
  • The War and the Crisis Of Individualism 141
  • The Structure of Future Society 166
  • Index 191
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