Labor and Farmer Parties in the United States, 1828-1928

By Nathan Fine | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
THE RISING TIDE OF SOCIALISM

BETWEEN 1901, when it was organized, and 1919, when it was split, the Socialist Party of the United States increased its vote from under 100,000 to about 900,000 in 1912. At the beginning of the latter year it claimed 1,039 of its dues paying members in public office, among whom were 56 mayors, over 300 aldermen, a number of state legislators, and one Congressman. With less than ten thousand members when it was launched the Socialist Party had 118,045 in 1912 and 108,504 before the schism in 1919. This membership included men, women, and young persons: the adults in the best years of their life, the youngsters making up in enthusiasm for what they lacked in experience. It included some of the highest paid and most articulate native American wage earners, as well as the militants of all nationalities in the trade unions. It comprised not a few of the tillers of the soil and a considerable group of idealists in every walk of American life. Besides a respectable vote, a number of public officials in power, and a growing membership in the main of sterling quality, the party had a well-oiled machine for propaganda and campaigns, with literature and a press, lecturers and organizers, and a number of auxiliary bodies to carry the message of socialism into every nook and cranny of America.

Up to 1912 the socialists were putting up an increasingly successful fight for their principles and program in the trade unions. In that year a socialist leader, Max S. Hayes, received about one-third of the total vote cast in

-214-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor and Farmer Parties in the United States, 1828-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.