Man's Quest for Social Guidance: The Study of Social Problems

By Howard W. Odum | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
THE SPIRIT AND METHOD OF SCIENCE

The Social Value of Truth . Throughout this volume attitudes towards social problems and objective methods of study constitute a chief point of emphasis. First and last an open-minded approach and a scientific method will not only result in finding and disseminating truth but will in themselves constitute an effective discipline in the ways of truth and social values. Professor Curtis, for instance, goes so far as to say that "the supreme value of research lies in the power of truth to harmonize conflict of human opinion and make coöperation possible." Thus our spirit and method of seeking truth become both a means and an end in this fascinating task of studying social problems and developing social guidance. This chapter will therefore continue the approach to human backgrounds and relationships, begun in the previous chapters, with a simple study of the search after truth and the broader humanistic spirit which must underlie the successful teaching of the social sciences. It may be well to begin our understanding of truth and knowledge by pointing to some of the folk estimates and references in literature that show the place they hold as social values.

The Age-long Search after Truth . Literature and experience abound in evidences of the universal search after truth and wisdom and of the recognition of their value to humanity upon the earth. There is, perhaps, no objective more universally accepted as a summum bonum than that revealed in the doctrine which proclaims that to know the truth "shall make you free." Socrates declared that man wise who knew that he did not know, and hence was open to the search after truth. Said the old Roman, " Plato is my friend, Socrates is my friend, but truth is a friend I prize above both." Another Roman said that "truth is mighty and will prevail"; and still another: "Truth never perishes." Sophocles early grounded his drama and philosophy on the principles that "truth is always straightforward," and "the truth is always the stronger

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man's Quest for Social Guidance: The Study of Social Problems
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 643

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.