Helping Teachers Understand Children: The Staff of the Division on Child Development and Teacher Personnel

By Karl W. Bigelow; American Council on Education. Commission on Teacher Education | Go to book overview

Evaluate the Study XI Teachers and Administrators

BY REPRODUCING extensive excerpts from the teachers' own records and work materials we have tried to make it possible for the reader to evaluate each element in the child-study program for himself. But practical school people also will have been wondering what the participating teachers and administrators thought of the study. Did the persons who took part feel that they were learning much of significance about human development and behavior? Did they notice significant changes in their own attitudes toward children? Did they report that real changes in classroom procedures, in curricula, or in the guidance of individual children resulted from their deepened insights? Did school principals and supervisors notice significant changes in the work of individual teachers or in the responses of certain children to their experiences at school? This chapter will supply answers to the questions in the words of the teachers, principals, and supervisors themselves.


NATURE OF THE EVALUATION

Local administrators and group leaders sought evaluations of the study from all participants toward the end of each school year. The administrators used the evaluations as a partial basis for deciding whether or not to continue the study, and the leaders used them as guides for planning next steps.

The procedure was simple and direct. Classroom teachers, principals, and supervisors were asked to turn in written appraisals of the study program in terms of its worth to them. General statements were to be supported by specific instances

-364-

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Helping Teachers Understand Children: The Staff of the Division on Child Development and Teacher Personnel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Commission on Teacher Education ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • I - What It Means To "Understand" a Child 1
  • Summary 19
  • II - Learning to Describe Behavior 21
  • Summary 40
  • III - Seeing the Child as a Member Of a Family 42
  • Summary 65
  • IV - Help from a Psychologist 67
  • Summary 101
  • V - Learning Some Explanatory Principles 103
  • VI - Group Meetings as A Study Method 131
  • Summary 164
  • VII - Looking for Patterns 166
  • Summary 226
  • VIII - Studying a Personality Through Time 227
  • Summary and Conclusions 270
  • IX - Studying the Interaction Of Children in Groups: Part One 275
  • Summary 314
  • X - Studying the Interaction Of Children in Groups: Part Two 316
  • Evaluate the Study Xi Teachers and Administrators 364
  • XII - Conducting a Program Of Child Study 401
  • Summary 453
  • XIII - What Experience Has Taught Us 454
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