9
INARTICULACY: LESBIANISM AND LANGUAGE IN POST-1945 GERMAN LITERATURE

Georgina Paul

'What are the words you do not yet have? What do you need to say?'

Audre Lorde1

T he public history of lesbianism -- and of lesbians -- in Germany has, during this century at least, been peculiarly bound up with the question of women's emancipation. It is not by chance that it was precisely in those periods when women were most active in challenging the roles prescribed for them within a social order shaped by the interests of male power -- broadly speaking the 1920s and the 1970s -- that lesbians and the issue of lesbianism made the most significant inroads into the public sphere, nor that it was in the periods of greatest ideological prescription with regard to the social role of women -- in Nazi Germany, Adenauer's Federal Republic, and the GDR -- that they were most effectively banished from it.

To some extent, then, the taboo that surrounded (and partially still surrounds) the lesbian has its correlation in the taboo that surrounded (and partially still surrounds) the woman who does not fit in with historically defined cultural expectations of womanhood, who rebels against the structures of a male-oriented society, who is active and articulate in her own interest and ultimately uncontrollably unfeminine. Being an extreme case, the lesbian perhaps offers a particularly sensitive measure of the degree to which the emancipatory process has progressed. For the lesbian striving to attain the position of articulate subject as a lesbian is also confronted with the larger taboo that surrounds her sexuality in a society quick to condemn any aberration from its heterosexual norms.

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taboos in German Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.