U.S. Presidents as Orators: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Halford Ryan | Go to book overview

30, 1815, reappeared in Andrew Jackson's July 10, 1832, veto of a similar act, and the arguments he used in vetoing congressional legislation providing for internal improvements, on March 3, 1817, were adopted by a number of his successors." Madison, then, is rhetorically significant because he provided models for future presidents.


RHETORICAL SOURCES

Archival Materials

Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.

National Archives.

University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Virginia State Library, Richmond, Virginia.

Elliot Jonathan. The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution as Recommended by the General Convention at Philadelphia. 2d ed., Vol. 3. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott and Co., 1881.

Hunt Gaillard, ed. The Writings of James Madison. (WJM). New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1900- 1910.

Hutchinson William T., et al., eds. The Papers of James Madison. 15 Vols. Chicago and Charlottesville. University of Chicago Press and University Press of Virginia, 1962.

Veit Helen E., Kenneth R. Bowling, and Charlene Bangs Bickford, eds. Creating the Bill of Rights: The Documentary Record from the First Federal Congress. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.


Rhetorical Studies

Brant Irving. James Madison: Father of the Constitution, 1787-1800. New York: Bobbs- Merrill Co., 1950.

Burns Edward M. James Madison: Philosopher of the Constitution. New York: Octagon Books, 1968.

Donovan Frank R. Mr. Madison's Constitution: The Story Behind the Constitutional Convention. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1965.

Ketcham Ralph L. James Madison: A Biography. New York: Macmillan, 1971.

Meyers Marvin, ed. The Mind of the Father: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison. New York: Bobbs-Merrill Co., Inc., 1973.

Riemer Neal. James Madison. New York: Washington Square Press, 1968.

Smith Craig R. To Form a More Perfect Union: The Ratification of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, 1787-1791. New York: University Press of America, 1993.


Rhetorical Monographs

Andrews James R. "They Chose the Sword: Appeals to War in Nineteenth-Century American Public Address." Today's Speech 17 ( 1969): 3-8.

Batty Paul W. "An Examination and Evaluation of Selected Speeches of James MadisonFather of the Constitution and Fourth President of the United States.",

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U.S. Presidents as Orators: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • An Introduction to Presidential Oratory ix
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES xvii
  • George Washington (1732-1799) 3
  • Conclusion 15
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 16
  • John Adams (1735-1826) 18
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 26
  • Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) 28
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 40
  • James Madison (1751-1836) 43
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 52
  • John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) 54
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 63
  • Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) 65
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 75
  • Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) 77
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 89
  • Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) 93
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 107
  • Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) 111
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 132
  • Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964) 134
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 144
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) 146
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 164
  • Harry S. Truman (1884-1972) 168
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 187
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969) 190
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 204
  • John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963) 210
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 225
  • Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973) 228
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 245
  • Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) 249
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 269
  • Gerald R. Ford (1913- ) 274
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 296
  • Jimmy Carter (1924- ) 299
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 311
  • Ronald Reagan (1911- ) 316
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 337
  • George Herbert Walker Bush (1924- ) 344
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 358
  • Bill Clinton (1946- ) 361
  • RHETORICAL RESOURCES 374
  • Index 377
  • About the Editor and Contributors 387
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