U.S. Presidents as Orators: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Halford Ryan | Go to book overview

was essential: "If we were to leave Somalia tomorrow, other nations would leave, too. Chaos would resume." The President discussed the continued commitment to withdraw our troops, "But we must also leave on our terms. We must do it right." To do it right, the President dispatched 1,700 additional troops to Somalia and stationed 3,600 combat Marines offshore. These forces would have four goals: "protect our troops and our bases, . . . keep open and secure the roads, the port and the lines of communication, . . . to keep the pressure on those who cut off relief supplies and attacked our people, . . . [and] through their pressure and their presence, our troops will help to make it possible for the Somali people . . . to reach agreements among themselves so that they can solve their problems and survive when we leave."

After Clinton, in stem sincerity, laid out the military response in Somalia, he concluded his remarks with an expression of "thanks and my gratitude and my profound sympathy to the families of the young Americans who were killed in Somalia." The Somalia and Iraq speeches were responses to short-term foreign policy threats. Neither incident festered and became worse. They represented Clinton's discreet, definable responses to specific acts of international terrorism.


CONCLUSION

Clinton is an accomplished speaker. Arguably, he fulfills the title of the great communicator more skillfully than the President for whom this phrase was coined. From televised talk shows to "Imus in the Morning" radio, from town halls to satellite hook-ups, from impromptu Q & A sessions with the press to a teleprompter that had the wrong speech on it for seven minutes, Clinton has demonstrated a command of the issues and an aplomb in speaking seldom seen in the history of the presidency. He faces critical issues of deficit reduction, health care, crime, welfare, and an often troubled international scene. A look at his first two years reveals a dynamic communicator struggling to mobilize a lethargic Congress and a skeptical public to "a new season of American renewal."


RHETORICAL RESOURCES

Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents. (WCPD). WCPD is available in many libraries and is available directly from the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, DC.

Vital Speeches of the Day (VS).

Dreams of Power and the Power of Dreams: The Inaugural Addresses of the Governors of Arkansas. (ARK). Edited by Marvin E. Boer. Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press, 1988.


E-Mail Options

The Clinton presidency is the first administration to utilize e-mail. A variety of e-mail sources exist including, but not limited to, the White House, the Na-

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U.S. Presidents as Orators: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • An Introduction to Presidential Oratory ix
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SOURCES xvii
  • George Washington (1732-1799) 3
  • Conclusion 15
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 16
  • John Adams (1735-1826) 18
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 26
  • Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) 28
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 40
  • James Madison (1751-1836) 43
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 52
  • John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) 54
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 63
  • Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) 65
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 75
  • Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) 77
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 89
  • Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) 93
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 107
  • Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) 111
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 132
  • Herbert Clark Hoover (1874-1964) 134
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 144
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) 146
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 164
  • Harry S. Truman (1884-1972) 168
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 187
  • Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969) 190
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 204
  • John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-1963) 210
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 225
  • Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908-1973) 228
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 245
  • Richard Milhous Nixon (1913-1994) 249
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 269
  • Gerald R. Ford (1913- ) 274
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 296
  • Jimmy Carter (1924- ) 299
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 311
  • Ronald Reagan (1911- ) 316
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 337
  • George Herbert Walker Bush (1924- ) 344
  • RHETORICAL SOURCES 358
  • Bill Clinton (1946- ) 361
  • RHETORICAL RESOURCES 374
  • Index 377
  • About the Editor and Contributors 387
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