African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice

By Kassie Freeman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book could not have been completed without the encouragement and support of all the contributing authors. In addition to the incredible amount of work they put into writing their own chapters, they have been friends, mentors, and invaluable resources. I will be forever grateful to each of them for listening to me when I was down-and-out, for sticking with me when I was applying pressure, and for believing in me throughout this process.

I would also like to thank Professor Robert Crowson in my department at Vanderbilt University for his belief in my scholarship and ideas and for encouraging me to pursue this project. Several graduate students at Vanderbilt University worked many hours reading and editing this manuscript. Specifically, I would like to thank Mia Alexander-Snow and Sybril Bennett. In addition to their chapters in this book, they have provided all the extra details that go into completing a manuscript. The support staff in my department also provided invaluable assistance. I would especially like to thank Martha Morrissey for her editorial assistance with this manuscript and with all of my writings and Ida Reale for her continuous support of me in every conceivable way.

To the many students who shared so many of their stories with me about education, I owe so much. It was those countless moving voices from so many African American high school students across many cities that I will carry with me forever and that will always provide the passion for my work.

The task of bringing this manuscript from merely chapters to a book belonged to Debra D. Walters. She spent countless hours thoroughly reviewing each chapter and the manuscript as a whole to ensure that we presented our works editorially sound. I will be forever grateful to her for her passion and caring about her work and the manuscript. We have established a very personal relationship which I hope will last for many years to come. Debra and I both owe much to Deborah Whitford, a production editor for Greenwood Publishing. She provided constant guidance and direction throughout this process.

-xiii-

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