African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice

By Kassie Freeman | Go to book overview

4
Historical Origins of Change: Implications for African Americans in Higher Education

Carolyn J. Thompson


INTRODUCTION

As the twenty-first century approaches, the collective efforts that brought about the educational progress of African Americans during the past century are threatened. Recent legislation in several states is almost certain to reduce the numbers of African American students admitted for both undergraduate and graduate study in public higher education ( Jaschik, 1995). Programs and financial resources once available in colleges and universities to correct historical racial inequities at the student and faculty levels have been challenged ( Healy, 1996b, 1996c). Departments and programs established in colleges and universities for the study of African peoples and the amelioration of educational and social conditions of African Americans in several states (i.e., Alabama, Mississippi, and Ohio) are in jeopardy as policy efforts are directed at their futures ( Guernsey, 1996; Healy, 1996a, 1996c; Jaschik, 1995). Public higher education institutions that have historically provided opportunities specifically for the individual and race uplift of African Americans are being threatened as federal and state legislation attempts to bring conditions about through policies that have always been challenged in practice. These escalating circumstances are leaving limited college options available to African Americans. African American youths today are no more responsible for the commitment (or lack) of elected officials to provide resources for their educational development, or the curricula available in their schools, than African American youths at any other time throughout this century. As the twentieth century closes, the educational and social warfare initiated over a century ago to sustain the overall social status of African Americans and protect the self- anointed privilege of others continues.

The accomplishments of this century and initiatives directed at improving educational outcomes for African Americans in the next century must first revisit the context that shaped the limits of what has been achieved so far and examine the

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.