African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice

By Kassie Freeman | Go to book overview

5
And Who Shall Control Their Minds?: Race Consciousness and Collective Commitments among African American Students

Walter R. Allen

Education has always played a central role in the determination of the circumstances of Black life in America. One cannot validly study the economic status, residential patterns, or future prospects of African Americans without making reference to the relationships between Blacks and the educational system of this country. Educational access, or the lack of it, has been and continues to be a powerful determinant of the unequal economic, cultural, political, and social status of Blacks in America ( Allen & Jewell, 1995). For this reason, Black Americans have historically struggled to gain equal access to the nation's schools and have expressed the desire to exert some control over the content of the schooling process as it relates to them ( Franklin, 1984). These motives were most succinctly stated during the 1960s social movements in New York City to gain community control of schools. The rallying motto was, "We are engaged in a struggle over the control of minds (and futures) of our children" ( Hare & Castenell, 1985, p. 24).

This chapter looks at collective consciousness and commitments among African American students in institutions of higher education in the United States for answers to the question of who controls the minds of college-educated Blacks. Do these students emerge from the schooling process with strong race consciousness and collective commitments that equip and motivate them to serve as effective advocates for the development of African American communities? Data are used from a national study of 1,500 African American undergraduates attending

____________________
This research was completed as part of the National Study of Black College Students. Funding was provided by the Ford and Charles S. Mott Foundations for data collection and by the Joyce Foundation for data analysis. Funding from the UCLA Academic Senate paid for paper preparation costs. Please address inquiries to the author at: Department of Sociology, 210 Haines Hall, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1551; email, WALLEN@UCLA.EDU.

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.