African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice

By Kassie Freeman | Go to book overview

observe teaching styles and other interactions of the faculty at HBCUs that allow them to become more involved academically with students. For example, Butler University and Shaw University might consider an exchange program so that students and faculty from a PWI can experience being in a different environment, even as a minority, and increase their awareness and understanding of the differences that exist in an HBCU. This program would help them appreciate and recognize how students of a different race and culture feel in a similar situation and why.

PWIs should find ways of encouraging faculty to become more involved with Black students. In this study, Black and White majority students benefited more from their academic activities than did Black minority students. A key influence in the success of Black students in institutions of higher education is the faculty.

Therefore, the mentoring, teaching, and servicing role of faculty in PWIs may need to be encouraged and rewarded for such related activities.

PWIs may need to increase their minority faculty, staff, and student population in order to provide Black students with the support they need to consider themselves a part of the campus community. Fleming ( 1984) believes that at times of frustration and alienation Black students on PWI campuses need to delve into academic activities instead of allowing those times to divert them from academic pursuits.

A two-way interaction needs to be developed where institutions and students become partners in maximizing educational gains. Perhaps programs need to be developed to teach all students how to take responsibility for their lives. In return, the institution should make sure that support, programming, and appropriate personnel are provided to assist students in utilizing the institution's resources to enhance their educational gains.


REFERENCES

Allen W. ( 1986). Gender and campus race differences in Black student academic performance, racial attitudes and college satisfaction. Atlanta, GA: Southern Education Foundation

Allen W. ( 1987). Black colleges vs. White colleges. Change, 19(3), 28-34.

Allen W. ( 1992). The color of success: African-American college student outcomes at predominantly White and historically Black public colleges and universities. H arvard Educational Review, 62(1), 26-44.

Anderson J. ( 1988). The education of Blacks in the south, 1860-1935. London: University of North Carolina.

Anderson J., & Adams M. ( 1992). Acknowledging the learning styles of diverse student populations: Implications for instructional design. New directions for teaching and learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Astin A. ( 1977). Four critical years: Effects of coolege on beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Astin A. W. ( 1982). Minorities in American higher education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Astin A. W. ( 1984). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of College Student Development, 26, 297-308.

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