African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice

By Kassie Freeman | Go to book overview

students' respective definitions of their identity), student perceptions of their "in the community status" were not the same for all the Black students from predominantly Black environments or for all of the Black students from predominantly White environments.

For administrators, within-group diversity among Black students presents a number of challenges to a PWI such as Western. These challenges include issues related to what administrators think about designing services and programs for "Black" students on campus; how the nature of the Black community is affected by a mix of students on campus from different environments; and who are at various degrees of comfort and acceptance with issues related to racial identity. In addition to playing their historical support role for students from predominantly Black environments, Black organizations at Western provide what appears to be an important racial identity exploration and development role for Black students from predominantly White communities. This suggests that the presence of Black organizations at PWIs should be supported and encouraged. However, for those students who have not been able to access the Black community on campus or who choose not to participate in Black organizations because of the perceived lack of fit between the organizations and their self-identities or experiences, there are few other places (cocurricular or within the academy) where students can explore what appears to be an important part of their identity development. It would seem that, in addition to student organizations, academic courses and the presence of Black faculty hind staff would be important resources for students in processing the complex issues related to racial identity development. Additionally, the added layer of "the Black community" to their Western experiences means that the lives of many Black students are, in some ways, more complicated than the lives of White students on campus. Recognition that Black students may have differential experiences at campuses such as Western and the availability of appropriate health and counseling services for Black students may be critical components for ensuring that the expectations or pressure Black students experience or exert on one another as part of the Black community identity do not adversely affect their student-life experiences or their academic progress. It would also seem worthwhile to understand the ways in which campuses reinforce the homogeneity of the Black student population. Although Black students may have many common needs based on their racial heritage, it is also important to recognize and respond to the increased diversity of backgrounds and experiences that Black students bring with them to a college environment and to recognize that when a Black student talks about wanting to "fit in" on campus, he or she could be referring to the White community on campus, the Black community on campus, or both.


APPENDIX: INTERVIEWEES NOT FORMALLY PROFILED IN CHAPTER

Brianna: A senior who grew up in New York and California. Brianna attended a predominantly White and a multicultural school. Brianna is not formally involved in Black organizations but does, on occasion, attend Black activities on campus.

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.