African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice

By Kassie Freeman | Go to book overview

Concluding Thoughts

Kassie Freeman

Researchers and policymakers alike will acknowledge that different paradigms are needed for research and policy making as they relate to African Americans' participation in higher education. After more than 30 years since the passing of the Civil Rights Act and 50 years since Brown v. Board of Education ( 347 U.S. 483, 74 S.Ct. 686, 98 L.Ed. 873 [ 1954]), African Americans' participation in higher educatior is nowhere near what it could or should be, particularly with the increased needs for higher skill levels. Persistent problems such as poor retention of African American students and faculty in higher education institutions are still far too commonplace. One important beginning would be having more African American researchers and scholars involved in research and policymaking related to the African American culture.

As the chapters in this book point out, African American researchers can bring a perspective unlike that of others. A prevalent theme throughout these chapters is that, while African Americans hold varying views, most share common frames of reference.

Someone once asked me, "Are you saying non-African Americans cannot or should not research African Americans?" That is not what I am saying, nor is any author of this book. However, individuals who research groups outside their own must provide a cultural context to their writing--these researchers must have an understanding of the other cultures as a whole system: the history, language, frame of reference, and customs. This cannot be done by merely coresearching with an African American, having African Americans as friends, or having one or two interview sessions with an African American individual or group. As Winbush and Alexander-Snow, among others, suggest, it means understanding the history of the African American people even before the beginning of slavery.

This book just touches the surface of pressing higher education research issues related to African Americans. Certainly, many more issues could be considered.

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Culture and Heritage in Higher Education Research and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.