The Director's & Officer's Guide to Advisory Boards

By Robert K. Mueller | Go to book overview

7
WEAK-SIGNAL GOVERNANCE/EARLY WARNING ADVISORY SYSTEMS

Walt Whitman once observed, "From any fruition of success, no matter what, shall come forth something to make a greater struggle necessary." For a number of reasons, many related to the impacts and devastation of World War II, American industry reached a pinnacle of success that lasted through the first two or three postwar decades. But, as everyone now recognizes, out of that success were born the seeds of a struggle that have literally become a life and death battle for survival for great chunks of our domestic industry. Because of this upheaval and the resulting turbulence, corporate management and boards of directors, in turn, face a greater struggle than they ever have before encountered. As a result, it becomes more difficult to conduct and govern our various organizations as in the past.

Harland Cleveland, dean of the University of Minnesota's Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, notes that the informatization of society has changed the context of our human activities in which information is now our crucial resource. 1Previously, the inherent characteristics of the world's physical resources (natural and manmade) made possible the development of five bases for hierarchy and discrimination. Cleveland suggests that these five hierarchies are crumbling today, based on the forces at work in our turbulent world. These five hierarchies are: hierarchy of power based on control (of new weapons, of energy sources, of trade routes, of markets and especially of knowledge); hierarchy of influence based on secrecy; hierarchies of class based on ownership; hierarchies of privilege based on early access to valuable resources; and hierarchies of politics based on geography.

-89-

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The Director's & Officer's Guide to Advisory Boards
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles from Quorum Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Advisors Unlimited 9
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Driving Forces 27
  • Notes 35
  • 3 - Counseling Versus Consulting Versus Mentoring 37
  • Notes 41
  • 4 - Role of an Advisory Board or Council 43
  • Notes 64
  • 5 - Activity and Societal Scan 65
  • 6 - Species of Advisory Boards 77
  • Notes 88
  • 7 - Weak-Signal Governance/Early Warning Advisory Systems 89
  • Notes 101
  • 8 - Advising Non- Profit-Seeking Versus Profit- Seeking Organizations 103
  • Notes 108
  • 9 - Care and Feeding of Advisory Boards 111
  • Notes 121
  • 10 - Insurance, Indemnification, and Contractual Matters 123
  • Notes 134
  • 11 - Advisory View of Corporate Strategy 135
  • Notes 148
  • 12 - Advisory Board Perspectives: Stakeholder Strategy 149
  • Notes 170
  • 13 - The Power of Advisory Board Networks 173
  • Notes 187
  • 14 - Advising the Family Business Board 189
  • Notes 201
  • 15 - Cultural Realities Facing Advisory Boards 203
  • 16 - Advising on Nonprofit Trusteeship Pathologies 223
  • Notes 240
  • Appendix ADVISEE SEARCH: GETTING INVITED TO SERVE AS ADVISOR 241
  • Notes 255
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCE READING LIST 257
  • Index 263
  • About the Author 279
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