The Director's & Officer's Guide to Advisory Boards

By Robert K. Mueller | Go to book overview

Appendix
ADVISEE SEARCH: GETTING INVITED TO SERVE AS ADVISOR

In the spring of 1987, Doyle Graf Mabley, a New York-based advertising firm, asked 600 people with household incomes of $100,000 or more to rank twenty symbols of personal success and achievement, such as owning an expensive car or holding an important position in government. The top three answers: owning a business, traveling abroad frequently, and sitting on the board of a cultural institution.

The Wall Street Journal of January 7, 1988, quoted Adam Stagliano, who supervised the survey, as commenting: "Owning a car or a boat, anyone can do if they have the money, but (being on a board) requires something else. They (directorships) are more traditional elitist symbols." Or, as Suzy, the New York Post's society columnist puts it: "You can be rich and powerful but not prestigious."

Being a director or trustee on a charitable or for-profit institution brings a cachet that cannot be ignored despite the liability exposure that may be involved. An advisory role may not be quite as prestigious, but it carries much of the same distinction.


PREPARATION STRATEGY

A preparation strategy for seeking an invitation to serve on an advisory board--or a statutory board of directions, for that matter--can be chunked into three categories: (1) personal attributes, (2) situational conditions, and (3) techniques or practices that may enhance opportunities for sitting on an advisory board. The range of valuable personal attributes is so broad and situation-specific that only some general qualifications can be usefully discussed. Most of the following is conventional wisdom.

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The Director's & Officer's Guide to Advisory Boards
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles from Quorum Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Advisors Unlimited 9
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Driving Forces 27
  • Notes 35
  • 3 - Counseling Versus Consulting Versus Mentoring 37
  • Notes 41
  • 4 - Role of an Advisory Board or Council 43
  • Notes 64
  • 5 - Activity and Societal Scan 65
  • 6 - Species of Advisory Boards 77
  • Notes 88
  • 7 - Weak-Signal Governance/Early Warning Advisory Systems 89
  • Notes 101
  • 8 - Advising Non- Profit-Seeking Versus Profit- Seeking Organizations 103
  • Notes 108
  • 9 - Care and Feeding of Advisory Boards 111
  • Notes 121
  • 10 - Insurance, Indemnification, and Contractual Matters 123
  • Notes 134
  • 11 - Advisory View of Corporate Strategy 135
  • Notes 148
  • 12 - Advisory Board Perspectives: Stakeholder Strategy 149
  • Notes 170
  • 13 - The Power of Advisory Board Networks 173
  • Notes 187
  • 14 - Advising the Family Business Board 189
  • Notes 201
  • 15 - Cultural Realities Facing Advisory Boards 203
  • 16 - Advising on Nonprofit Trusteeship Pathologies 223
  • Notes 240
  • Appendix ADVISEE SEARCH: GETTING INVITED TO SERVE AS ADVISOR 241
  • Notes 255
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCE READING LIST 257
  • Index 263
  • About the Author 279
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