Government Structures in the U.S.A. and the Sovereign States of the Former U.S.S.R: Power Allocation among Central, Regional, and Local Governments

By James E. Hickey Jr.; Alexej Ugrinsky | Go to book overview

43
Federalism and Compensation for Accidental Injuries
Vern R. WalkerThis chapter discusses federalism considerations in the design and implementation of compensation systems for accidental injuries to persons. By "accidental injuries" I mean the wide range of unintended injuries that occur to people in the course of daily life. These injuries include such common events as accidents in the household, health care injuries (such as side effects from drugs or unintended accidents during hospitalization), and accidents resulting from the use of consumer products. The term also includes transportation accidents, whether in private automobiles or public transportation (on land or sea, or in air travel). Workplace accidents are also included, as are widespread public health disasters such as nuclear accidents and earthquakes.Total dollar costs of such accidents are difficult to estimate reasonably, let alone confirm. What is clear, however, is that the cost of such accidents can be a very substantial percentage of a nation's gross domestic product. For example, a recent governmental study estimates that the costs of injuries and property damage in motor vehicle accidents alone in the United States in 1988 were $280 billion. 1 The National Safety Council estimates that the cost of workplace accidents in the United States in 1989 was $48.5 billion, with some 1.7 million people being injured. 2Estimates of the costs of the Chernobyl nuclear accident have ranged as high as 200 billion rubles, according to reports published in 1990, not counting the loss of productivity of the hundreds of thousands of people in the fallout zone. 3 Such societal losses are real, regardless of how federal, state, and local governments choose to deal with them.Although many losses due to accidents can be measured in economic terms, many cannot. Accident losses include:
1. direct expenses resulting from the accident, such as health care expenses and

-446-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Government Structures in the U.S.A. and the Sovereign States of the Former U.S.S.R: Power Allocation among Central, Regional, and Local Governments
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 474

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.