Politics and Public Debt: The Dominion, the Banks, and Alberta's Social Credit

By Robert L. Ascah | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

WITHOUT THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF PROFESSOR PAUL BOOTHE OF THE Department of Economics at the University of Alberta my study on politics, public debt and debt management in Canada would not have been developed into this book. His research on the early fiscal history of the Province of Alberta brought him to read much of what follows.

I have fond memories of my research time at both The Bank of Nova Scotia Archives in Toronto and the Bank of Canada Archives in Ottawa. Jane Nokes at ScotiaBank and Jane Witty of "The Bank" were always courteous and supportive in locating material and reviewing the appropriate references and text of the quotations used. In revising my dissertation for publication, I have also had the assistance of Corrine Millar of the Bank of Canada Archives and Matt Szybalski of the Bank of Nova Scotia Archives.

During my time in Ottawa, I had the great pleasure to meet the late Ralph McKibben who served as deputy governor of the Bank of Canada. Mr. McKibben was an invaluable source of information and perspective in giving context to the period under consideration. The late George Watts, also a former senior officer with the Bank of Canada, was extremely helpful in discussing some of the files routed out of the Public Archives (now the National Archives of Canada) and the Bank of Canada. Alec Keith, who was the Bank of Canada's senior representative in Edmonton during the time I embarked on my research, was generous in arranging interviews and explaining the nuances of central bank's cash management to an uninitiated political scientist. I would also like to thank Nigil Gunn of Bell Gouinlock whose sense of humour and remarkable recall of events in the 1930s gave this fascinating period in Canada's financial history excitement and life.

I would also like to acknowledge the assistance of the anonymous reviewers whose suggestions on organization have been invaluable in clarifying the intent and themes of the book. In addition the professional editorial and production support of Mary Mahoney-Robson at the University of Alberta Press was critical in the final stages of this project.

-vii-

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