The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures

By Francis D. Kelly | Go to book overview

Preface

This book discusses object representation assessment of the adolescent. It is designed to introduce the reader to essential theoretical tenets of object relations theory, especially as they apply to the adolescent, and to illustrate how this theoretical model lends itself to the clinical situation regarding the psychological assessment of object representation parameters in normal and disturbed adolescents. Several key assumptions guide this work.

The first assumption is that object representations are psychological constructs that capture the multidimensional aspects of the individual's inner template. More specifically, they order, categorize, and detail the vicissitudes of affective and cognitive experiences related to past and present experiences that relate to the self and others.

The second assumption is that these representations or multi-faceted schemata serve as a type of lighthouse or beacon that helps to orient, direct, and guide the nature of a person's relatedness with others. The bulk of the emphasis stresses the examination and exploration of how object representation information, vividly depicted by empirically derived measures, can provide a rich, clinically relevant and multidimensional perspective capturing the nuance and uniqueness of a given adolescent's inner representational world. An attempt is made to illustrate how this information may in turn be translated into hypotheses and prognostications regarding the adolescent's preferred transactions with his or her interpersonal world. This also extends to musings and informed hunches regarding patterns of relatedness in relation to the clinical situation.

This volume offers an assessment paradigm complementary to the more widely used approaches to the interpretation of the Rorschach and

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