The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures

By Francis D. Kelly | Go to book overview

Introduction

Since the mid- 1980s, child psychologists who are involved in conducting psychological assessments have been increasingly influenced by three major factors that have emerged and converged, resulting in a significant alteration in the way they conduct their work. In two instances, the results only served to improve and enhance the evaluative process, and ultimately enhanced pronouncements and observations in relation to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In the third case, there is measured judgment as to what the final results will be with respect to either adding something of benefit, or greatly detracting from optimal services to child and adolescent patients.

The aforementioned factors relate in the first case to the impressive efforts of Exner, Weiner, and their colleagues ( Exner & Weiner, 1992; Exner & Weiner, 1995) who developed an encyclopedic empirical and nomothetic normative database utilized in the Rorschach assessment of children and adolescents. The second factor involves the gradual application of object relations theory and tenets to the idiographic interpretation of child and adolescent projective test material, particularly the Rorschach and TAT. The final factor represents the growing presence and impact of managed health care as it dictates and increasingly governs when, and when not, psychological assessments will be considered as an appropriate and necessary component of the evaluation process. Expanded discussion of how these three factors significantly influenced and impacted the arena of child and adolescent personality assessment follows.

Although the Comprehensive System ( Exner, 1978; Exner & Weiner, 1992, 1995) continues to be the subject of criticism in select quarters

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.