The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures

By Francis D. Kelly | Go to book overview

of conflict, hinted at by SCORS material. This young woman's situation reveals a somewhat unsettled, multifaceted inner vista, although there would be every reason to suspect she will continue to move along and realize a productive adjustment over time.


SUMMARY

This chapter attempts to provide the reader with how a wide range of adolescents, seen as doing reasonably well in their lives, present their inner object representational landscapes. As psychologists, we often lack the opportunity to spend time with children or adolescents who are doing well. There is a dearth of normative material pertaining to both the MOA and the SCORS as these are applied to adolescents. Thus, the present findings could be construed as cautionary or tentative if viewed from a nomothetic perspective. Changing the lens in order to incorporate an idiographic perspective does allow for a more valid and individually tailored interpretive approach that renders the SCORS and MOA material more immediate, relevant, and sensitive to a particular adolescent's developmental position.

In the current cases we witness how external observations and comments about a given adolescent's object relatedness converge with and reinforce psychological data, thus lending support for the contention that MOA and SCORS material ultimately translates into observable behavior (i.e., object relatedness). It is also possible to witness how object relations functioning is hardly a unitary or global construct, that it contains multiple facets, and that there is an indication of intrasubject variability when different dimensions are considered. In most instances, there is more intrasubject consistency than variability, which is more likely to be the case with individuals who do not present major psychological disorders.

In the majority of instances, MOA and SCORS material is fairly convergent, as opposed to divergent, leading to the conclusion that both scales are useful and appropriate measures of an adolescent's object representational world. The SCORS is more sensitive to capturing nuance and subtle details not obtained when one looks solely to MOA material, which appears to assess a more global, yet integral, measure of an adolescent's object relations functioning and capacity.

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