The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures

By Francis D. Kelly | Go to book overview

6
Introduction to Clinical Case Illustrations

This chapter is divided into three sections. In the first, three clinical cases of younger adolescents are introduced in order to illustrate instances of less disturbed object relations functioning, and to document examples where more disturbed developmental adaptation is manifest. In the second, three clinical illustrations of youngsters in middle adolescence are presented in order to again contrast adolescents' Rorschach and TAT responses. Object representation material (e.g., MOA and SCORS results) is translated into impressions about adolescents' object relations functioning, and clear and informative directives regarding therapeutic planning are given. The final portion of the chapter provides clinical material of three older adolescents. Case material serves to highlight aspects of disturbance relating to self and others and the utility of object representations data in regard to directing and informing clinical treatment directions and parameters.

The nine case illustrations emphasize brief exposition of demographic and clinical material followed by the MOA and SCORS data. This provides for inspection and evaluation of the adolescents' object representation schemata, with this information then transformed into observations and diagnostic formulations vis-à-vis the adolescents' object relatedness. Finally, this material is used to generate hypotheses and guidelines in relation to the treatment course, with particular focus on articulating which treatment modalities seem indicated, what transference phenomena should be anticipated, and what additional areas of concern need to be explored and addressed in light of object representational material.

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