The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures

By Francis D. Kelly | Go to book overview

Emily would seem to be an appropriate candidate for a psychotherapeutic approach emphasizing a supportive-expressive treatment and inviting her participation in teasing out the factors that led to the development of her eating disorder. But on a cautionary note, and relying on information gleaned from object representation material, the therapeutic approach should be respectful of her disposition, emphasizing a need to enable her to participate in a manner allowing her to feel some control and comfort lest she be left exposed and vulnerable. This is a situation where severe and extreme transference reactions will probably not emerge, but the more likely scenario will involve a gradual slowing down, passive-avoidant, and immobilizing repertoire of reactions designed to, consciously and unconsciously, communicate the emergence of the affectively charged material Emily is having difficulty acknowledging and integrating.


SUMMARY

The aforementioned clinical presentations provided examples of how the dynamic formulation is generated from projective material. Specifically, MOA and SCORS data were used to illustrate and define the central psychodynamic conflicts in three adolescent patients. The primary emphasis was on utilizing object relations tenets as the theoretical reference point in clarifying the exact nature of the respective adolescent's psychological difficulties. The chapter emphasized how object representation measures provide a key to understanding how current symptomatology reflects varying degrees of object relations derailment, and how object representation material offers the clinician a comprehensive, psychological blueprint to refer to in the planning and development of treatment options and direction.

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