The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures

By Francis D. Kelly | Go to book overview

10
Concluding Observations and Remarks

In undertaking this project, I had several distinct and rather clear objectives in mind. These served to provide a sense of cohesiveness and integration that, I hope, will result in an appreciation of how the final effort reflects a tapestry, weaving aspects of theory, clinical observation, and concerns relating to object representation assessment and subsequent treatment considerations with adolescent patients.

Before proceeding with a discussion of specific objectives, a comment on the overriding goal providing the major impetus for undertaking this project seems warranted. I was greatly influenced and excited by the possibilities of introducing the tenets of object relations theory into my own immediate clinical work emphasizing psychological assessment, but I was frustrated by the paucity of research directly relating to children and adolescents. The work of Tuber ( 1992) and Westen ( 1991b) provided an introduction to empirical measures designed to capture and articulate the breadth and depth of children's and adolescents' object representations, the inner "hard drive" or template that informed and directed manifestations of object relatedness.

This led me to the attempt to utilize object representation measures, the MOA, first developed by Urist ( 1977), and the SCORS, which originated from the efforts of Westen and colleagues ( Westen et al., 1985) in the evaluation of object relations functioning in younger children ( Kelly, 1996). I was encouraged by the response of colleagues who found that these measures, employed in an idiographic approach to the consideration of TAT and Rorschach material, could offer clinical and heuristic possibilities in relation to assessment as treatment.

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Adolescents: Tat and Rorschach Measures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.