The History of Motion Pictures

By Maurice Bardèche; Robert Brasillach et al. | Go to book overview

he was seen in Arthur Robison terrifying A Night of Horror and in Lubitsch Marriage of Louise Rohrbach ( 1917).

These films enjoyed an immense success. Cinemas, many of them quite luxurious, sprang up all over Germany. Max Reinhardt was paid four hundred thousand marks for making a single film. Actors earned as much as one hundred and fifty thousand marks. By the end of 1918, in spite of war, famine and threatening revolution, a profound feeling for the film had been deeply implanted in Germany and already there was an originality about the German product which was to develop very fruitfully.

The Danes, whether in their German productions or in those made actually in Denmark, can be distinguished only with difficulty from the Germans. Their neutrality at first stood them in good stead. To compete with America, now gradually cornering the European market, Nordisk made more than three hundred films in the first years of the war--films adapted from novels or from plays and a quantity of short comedies featuring the Danish comedians Stribolt, Alstrup and Buch. A newly formed Danish company also brought Benjamin Christensen to the fore; he had made his first film, The Mysterious X, in 1913. But little by little, Nordisk, faced with ever increasing competition, lost its preeminence and the Danish film on which such high hopes had been founded was finally defeated in the battle for the European market. Christensen went to Sweden and made his best film, Witchcraft, there. By the time the war was over Ufa had killed the Danish film.


5. The Swedish Film

DURING the war the Swedish film, safely removed from the hostilities, really got under way. Each year Victor Sjöström, who was to become the foremost of Swedish directors, made four or five films in which he also acted. In 1914 it was One Among Them, Judge Not, The Traitor's Money, Vultures of the Sea. In 1916 it was Therese, Dödskyssen and--most noteworthy of them--Terje Vigen, after Ibsen Brand. All of them revealed a photographic

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The History of Motion Pictures
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword xi
  • Translator's Note *
  • Part One - The Birth of the Film 1895-1908 1
  • Part Two - The Prewar Film 1908-1914 37
  • Part Three - The Cinema during the World War 1914-1918 91
  • 1 - The Italian Film 95
  • 2 - The American Film 98
  • 3 - The French Film 127
  • 4 - The German Film and the Danish Film 134
  • 5 - The Swedish Film 136
  • 6 - The Russian Film 140
  • Part Four - The Emergence of an Art 1919-1923 145
  • 1 - The French Film 147
  • 2 - The Russian Film 168
  • 4 - The German Film 187
  • 5 - The Italian Film 196
  • 6 - The American Film 199
  • Part Five - The Classic Era of the Silent Film 1923-1929 223
  • 1 - The French Film 225
  • 2 - The German Film 251
  • 3 - The Scandinavian Film 263
  • 4 - The Russian Film 266
  • 5 - The American Film 283
  • 6 - The Death of Art 300
  • Part Six - The Talking Films 1929-1935 303
  • 1 - The American Film 305
  • 3 - The German Film 341
  • 4 - The Russian Film 353
  • 5 - A World Industry 361
  • Part Seven - Forty Years of Film 367
  • Editorial Postscript: 1935-1938 381
  • Index of Film Titles 391
  • General Index 405
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