Military Deterrence in History: A Pilot Cross-Historical Survey

By Raoul Naroll; Vern L. Bullough et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 17
THE DUTCH REVOLT
1576-1585: Conspicuous State, Spain; Conspicuous Rival, The Netherlands.

PART 1: SKETCH OF HISTORICAL SETTING (Chiefly after Geyl, Motley, Merriman, and The Cambridge Modern History, vol. 3)

DURING THE RANDOMLY SELECTED DECADE from 1576 to 85, Hapsburg Spain was the dominant political power on the European scene, and Philip II, king of Spain, the most powerful of the European rulers. This Hapsburg domination was a continuation, albeit in divided form, of the power established by Charles V, who had not only been king of Spain but the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire as well. Charles came to believe that Hapsburg domains were too extensive for any one man to rule, and had gradually transferred the richest areas to his son Philip, leaving the imperial title to his brother, Ferdinand. By the end of 1556 Philip held the most valuable Hapsburg possessions in the Old and New World, including the various American territories, the Philippines, the Netherlands, Franche Comté, southern Italy, Sicily, and Milan. Ferdinand, who held Austria and Hungary, had been emperor in everything but name since 1552, when Charles had left Germany (although it was not until 3 May 1558 that Charles's abdication became effective).

The extent and wealth of the Spanish possessions made the Spanish ruler a feared rival of almost all the other powers in Europe. The Italian peninsula was almost completely Hispanicized, with only the pope and the Venetians maintaining a precarious independence.

Spanish possessions in the Netherlands (including Luxemburg) and Franche Comté cut deeply into what the French felt to be their

-236-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Military Deterrence in History: A Pilot Cross-Historical Survey
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 418

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.