The American Experience in Education

By John Barnard; David Burner | Go to book overview

11
ORIGINS OF THE CATHOLIC PAROCHIAL SCHOOL

Robert D. Cross

The way to secure a proper religious and moral education has always posed problems for religious minorities. During the common school revival of 1830 to 1850, the public schools moved in the direction of a nonsectarian Protestantism. This usually consisted of such practices as reciting the Lord's Prayer, the singing of a hymn, and a daily reading from the Bible. Supposedly this approach was religiously neutral. In fact, it reflected the views of and was acceptable to virtually all of the Protestant denominations, but was noxious to those of other faiths. In addition, many non-Protestants objected to the cleansing of public school subjects of a specific religious content. They maintained that all branches of learning, being parts of a unified system of doctrine, had to make manifest their philosophical and theological foundations. No mode of adjustment to nonsectarian Protestant influence on the public schools was more significant than the Catholic parochial school movement. Professor Cross, a specialist in American religious and immigration history, links the establishment of parochial schools with the cultural as well as religious needs of Catholic immigrants from Europe.

For the strength of Protestant interest in establishing and influencing the public schools, see Timothy L. Smith, "Protestant Schooling and American Nationality, 1800-1850," Journal of American History, 53 ( 1967), pp. 679-695, and David Tyack, "The Kingdom of God and theCommon School: Protestant Missionaries and the Educational Awakening in the West,"

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The American Experience in Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.