The Writings of E. M. Forster

By Rose Macaulay | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD

THERE has always been recognized a pleasant amorous disease to which the English are peculiarly susceptible: falling in love with Italy. It would appear to have been prevalent since the early Middle Ages, and has been by many testy and sardonic writers deplored, as making English travellers who had tripped to the continent sillier and even more vicious than they had been before. Even the patriotic and raceproud John Milton contracted it. Indeed, few of our island race have been immune, until recent years, when Fascism, Signor Mussolini, Abyssinia, the Spanish invasion, Italian broadcast views on Britain, and other of those unfortunate disasters which tarnish international affections, have turned this xenophily rather into an achievement, like the love of God, than the spontaneous liking of people for their charm which is what the English used to feel for the Italians.

Mr. Forster, residing for a time in Italy in more felicitous days than these, fell deeply in love with it and with its denizens, with this enchanting, unaffected, cynical, callous, gay and somewhat

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The Writings of E. M. Forster
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Chapter I- Setting 7
  • Chapter II- Beginnings 20
  • Chapter III- Where Angels Fear to Tread 35
  • Chapter IV- The Longest Journey 46
  • Chapter V- Modern Literature and Dante 66
  • Chapter VI- A Room with a View 78
  • Chapter VII- Howards End 98
  • Chapter VIII- Interval 128
  • Chapter IX- Guide Book 137
  • Chapter X- Alexandrian Essays 144
  • Chapter XI- Other Essays 151
  • Chapter XII- A Passage to India 176
  • Chapter XIII- Ironies and Appreciations 204
  • Chapter XIV- Aspects of the Novel 225
  • Chapter XV- The Sinister Corridor 248
  • Chapter XVI- Biography 257
  • Chapter XVII- Some Conclusions 268
  • Bibliography 301
  • Index 303
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