Preface

THREE CONSIDERATIONS have led to the title of this book. The past fifteen years have seen more concentration on Kant's aesthetic theory than any other part of the century, and, quite independently of the structural role that Kant's theory plays in the Critical edifice, it has gradually come to light how worthy a companion the Critique of Judgment is to his other major writings. In publishing Eva Schaper Studies in Kant's Aesthetics in 1979, the Edinburgh University Press has already contributed once to this flowering of interest. It pursues its concern with the present volume.

Then, three chapters of an earlier book, Aesthetic Reconstructions, were devoted to Kant's thought in this area. While I stand by the main web of what was offered there, important threads still need to be woven into that about which I had little or nothing to say. Also, I see now that some earlier choices of emphasis should be corrected, as well as a number of downright mistakes. For the most part, the present book pursues my interest in Kantian thought without covering the same ground as before in more than marginal ways. There, I was concerned to develop a fully integrated picture of the Critique's central theme, how universally committing aesthetic judgments can be supported from the extremely narrow experiential basis on which they are made; here, that issue is set aside, and others taken up in its place.

Third, many of the more interesting aspects of Kant's aesthetic thought emerge only by extrapolation from hints and suggestions which are not extensively developed in his writing. So, the

-v-

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Kantian Aesthetics Pursued
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface v
  • Chapter One - Taste, Perception and Experience 1
  • Notes 15
  • Chapter Two - Necessity and Taste 17
  • Notes 39
  • Chapter Three - Truth, Taste and the Supersensible 41
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter Four - Hume, Kant and the Standard of Taste 64
  • Notes 84
  • Chapter Five - The Idealism of Purposiveness 87
  • Notes 98
  • Chapter Six - The Possibility of Art 101
  • Notes 121
  • Chapter Seven - Music 124
  • Notes 153
  • Chapter Eight - Architecture and Sculpture 157
  • Index of Topics 181
  • Index Locorum 182
  • Index of Names 184
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