extend our native common sense as widely as may be proper.

It would be an illusion to suppose that this is something we might hope to achieve without a good measure of dedication and effort.


NOTES
1.
Notice, though, that, while the grounds on which the judgment is advanced are a priori, what is empirical and synthetic is its content.
2.
Karl Ameriks, ' "Kant and the objectivity of taste"', British Journal of Aesthetics 23 ( 1983), pp. 3, 4.
3.
'DC' stands for 'disinterestedly contemplates' here, and the universal quantifier (y) ranges over idealized judges rather than actual ones
4.
This is despite the absolutely explicit claim that the judgment of taste is merely subjectively valid (cf. §33.4: 'Its peculiarity, however, consists in the fact that, although it has merely subjective validity, still it extends its claims to all subjects, as unreservedly as it would if it were an objective judgment, resting on grounds of cognition and capable of being proved to demonstration'). The issue is discussed in section II of the previous chapter.
5.
Kant has to make room for p's being true, while seeming false to me and indeed actually seeming false to everyone. Once, the Earth assuredly looked flat, and no-one could do anything about it. Kant never got round to considering the details of his proposal.
6.
I shall say nothing here about what just form criticism might take in the aesthetic case. What Kant has to say about that emerges from his discussion of indeterminate concepts, and that is discussed at some length in Chapter Three below.
7.
At §18, Kant says that the necessity is not one that everyone will take pleasure, but that they ought to. A parallel thought must hold for straightforwardly cognitive judgments too.
8.
Nor is it one which we would ever have much interest in spelling out if we could, except possibly as indicating paths which we know already to have been trodden and which any artist of ambition and repute had better avoid if he is to avoid being written off as a mere epigon.
9.
At §57.2, Kant sees that intelligible explanations have to come to a stop, and there he invokes the notion of the supersensible to call a halt. I discuss this in Chapter Three, taking his appeal to the noumenal as essentially negative in nature. The present appeal to a 'rule' could well enough be understood in a similar way.
10.
Of course, there could be a simpler explanation. Kant thinks that wherever there is a necessity there has to be a rule, that all necessities are in one way or another rule-driven. There are strong signs of this idea at work in the Prolegomena, where the peculiar necessity that belongs to objectively valid judgments is put down to the operation of the categories, which are themselves regularly spoken of as rules. But I surmise that there may be a less idiosyncratic thought at work as well.

-39-

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Kantian Aesthetics Pursued
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface v
  • Chapter One - Taste, Perception and Experience 1
  • Notes 15
  • Chapter Two - Necessity and Taste 17
  • Notes 39
  • Chapter Three - Truth, Taste and the Supersensible 41
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter Four - Hume, Kant and the Standard of Taste 64
  • Notes 84
  • Chapter Five - The Idealism of Purposiveness 87
  • Notes 98
  • Chapter Six - The Possibility of Art 101
  • Notes 121
  • Chapter Seven - Music 124
  • Notes 153
  • Chapter Eight - Architecture and Sculpture 157
  • Index of Topics 181
  • Index Locorum 182
  • Index of Names 184
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