Tar: A Midwest Childhood

By Sherwood Anderson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI

HENRY FULTON was a thick-shouldered, thick- headed boy much larger than Tar. They lived in the same part of an Ohio town and when Tar went to school he had to walk right past the Fulton place. There was a small frame house on the bank of a creek and near a bridge, and back of it, in the little valley made by the creek, was a cornfield and a thicket of uncleared land. Henry's mother was a stout red-faced woman who went about the back yard in her bare feet. Her husband drove a dray. Tar could go to school another way. He could walk along a railroad embankment or go clear around by the waterworks pond, nearly a half mile out of the way.

The railroad embankment was fun. There was a certain risk. Tar had to cross the railroad bridge, built high up over the creek, and when he was in the middle of it he looked down. Then he glanced nervously up and down the tracks and shivers ran through his body. What if a train should come? He planned what he would do.

-127-

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Tar: A Midwest Childhood
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword ix
  • Part I 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 31
  • Chapter III 71
  • Chapter IV 91
  • Chapter V 107
  • Part Two 125
  • Chapter VI 127
  • Chapter VII 148
  • Chapter VIII 157
  • Chapter IX 166
  • Chapter X 170
  • Chapter XI 176
  • Part III 197
  • Chapter XII 199
  • Chapter XIII 223
  • Part IV 237
  • Chapter XIV 239
  • Chapter XV 254
  • Part V 269
  • Chapter XVI 271
  • Chapter XVII 285
  • Chapter XVIII 298
  • Chapter XIX 313
  • Chapter XX 320
  • Chapter XXI 326
  • Chapter XXII 342
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