The United States after the World War

By James C. Malin | Go to book overview
The national-origins proposal, which was not to become operative until 1927, aroused great hostility and presented so many difficulties that by joint resolution of March 4, 1927, the date of its going into effect was postponed one year. The actual differences in application between the two proposals (the numerical quota of 2 per cent and the national-origins quota) were very small as respects the old immigration and the new, but there were radical differences in respect to nationalities. The English, Dutch, Italians, and Russians would be radically increased by the national-origins method, whereas the Germans, Norwegians, Swedes, Danes, Swiss, French, Irish, and Bohemians would be reduced. The objections of the racial groups were again effective in the face of a presidential election, and by an act approved April 2, 1928, another year's postponement was ordered. The proclamation applying the national-origins method was issued, although reluctantly as a mandatory duty, March 22, 1929, to be effective July 1.The law of naturalization was for the most part left as it was. The act of 1870 authorized naturalization of white persons and persons of African descent. An act of May 9, 1918, provided that men honorably discharged from the military or naval service of the United States might be admitted to citizenship without meeting the residence requirement of five years. An act of September 22, 1922, provided that the marriage of an alien woman to a citizen of the United States did not naturalize her; to become an American citizen she must go through the same process as any other alien.
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
ABBOTT, EDITH. Historical Aspects of the Immigration Problem. The University of Chicago Press, 1926.
ABBOTT, EDITH. Immigration: Select Documents and Case Records. The University of Chicago Press, 1924.
GARIS, R. L. Immigration Restriction. The Macmillan Company, 1927.
STEPHENSON, G. M. History of American Immigration. Ginn and Company, 1926.

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